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Emma Gerstein
May 14, 2020Facebook Live Masterclass with CYSOTune in Friday May 15 for a Facebook Live masterclass at 5 pm CST
May 14, 2020Book lessons online!
May 28, 2017CSO announcement
March 30, 2017Audition Cafe interview
March 30, 2017CYSO alumni interview
February 15, 2017Emma wins Chicago Symphony Orchestra second flute audition!

Emma Gerstein is second flute of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. She was appointed to the post in 2017 by Music Director Riccardo Muti. Before her appointment to the CSO, she appeared with the Orchestra as a guest several times, including performances during the Asia 2016 tour with Riccardo Muti. Prior to joining the CSO, Gerstein most recently served as Principal Flute of the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra in New Zealand. Gerstein was a Flute Fellow at the New World Symphony and Principal Flute of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra in Kentucky. She has performed with the New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, as well as the Milwaukee and Seattle Symphony Orchestras.
Outside of her chair in the orchestra, Emma enjoys playing in smaller settings such as CSO MusicNow, a series featuring contemporary works curated by the CSO Composer in Residence, the CSO Chamber Series, and Once Upon A Symphony, a concert series for young children and families. Gerstein also serves as a flute coach for the students in the Civic Orchestra.
Known for her “especially beautiful work” (Chicago Reader), Emma remains an active chamber musician and soloist, recently appearing in Paquito D’Rivera’s Flute Concerto, Gran Danzon with the Lexington Philharmonic. Gerstein has performed with eighth blackbird, Chicago Chamber Musicians, Dempster Street Pro Musica, Civitas, and Spektral Quartet. Spring 2020 brings Gerstein back to Australia for more concerts with harpist Emily Granger.
A native of Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood, Gerstein began her flute studies at age 8 with Susan Levitin and was a member of the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra.  She went on to study at Manhattan School of Music with Robert Langevin and at Indiana University with Thomas Robertello, and has participated in the Aspen, Spoleto USA, Sarasota, Orford and Cabrillo festivals. 
Gerstein teaches at Roosevelt University and has given masterclasses at the University of Kentucky, Auckland University, Northwestern University, Indiana University, The Australian National Academy of Music, and as a guest of the Chicago Flute Club and the Utah Flute Association.

It plays a sprightly rendering of Rossini's familiar Overture to The Barber of Seville (fun, if a little odd in a program all about Stravinsky and Ravel), followed by a truly magical performance of Ravel's Mother Goose (with especially beautiful work by flautist Emma Gerstein). Deanna IsaacsChicago Reader
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The Louisville Orchestra's principal oboe sat in as guest principal oboe for Friday's concert, but the more remarkable playing came from Emma Gerstein, a Chicago native playing her first concert as the CSO's new second flute.John Von RheinChicago Tribune
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Striking Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) musicians Emma Gerstein, Max Raimi, Karen Basrak and Rong-Yan Tang gave a free, well-attended public performance on April 20. The remarkable strike concert took place before a packed house at the Flatts and Sharpe music store in the Rogers Park neighborhood.

The longest ever strike by CSO musicians has reached a critical juncture with the intervention of outgoing Chicago Democratic Mayor Rahm Emanuel. While he has remained silent on the strike up to this point, Emanuel has a record of defending the interests of the corporate and financial elite as mayor. The CSO board and management, which is demanding a ruthless overhaul of the musicians’ pensions by imposing a 401(k) style plan, also has close political and financial ties to Emanuel.

On Friday evening Emanuel announced that he had worked out a deal with the musicians and the board. Whatever the nature of the deal, which has not been made public, musicians and workers should be extremely wary. Sam Zell—husband of the chair of the CSO board, Helen Zell—donated over $300,000 to Emanuel in previous election cycles. Robert Kohl, another member of the board and also a member of Emanuel’s election campaign team, has donated over $28,000 to the mayor.

Musicians should be prepared to reject any concessions deal brokered by the mayor and fight to expand their struggle by appealing to the broadest sections of workers to break the isolation being imposed by the trade unions, which have not lifted a finger in their support.


CSO musicians Emma Gerstein and Max Raimi speak. Video produced by Michael Walters.
World Socialist Web Site writer Jeff Lusanne spoke to flutist Emma Gerstein and violist Max Raimi about the broader issues in the strike last week.

Jeff Lusanne: Tell us about your strike and what the issues are?

Emma Gerstein: The strike began six weeks ago, almost seven weeks ago. The main issues are wages and retirement benefits. The CSO has had a pension benefit for the past 50 years and they are trying to change that to something more like a 401(k).

Max Raimi: We were playing under our old contract since the season began in mid-September. They decided that there’s some people left in the world that have a pension and that’s not the way they feel the world should be.

That’s my take on it, because they’re not saving all that much money with the defined-contribution stuff they want to do. I think it’s ideological. The other issue: we’ve always been one of the preeminent orchestras in the world because we always had this great contract. People would come from other orchestras all over the country and the world. The last couple of negotiations our contract started slipping behind other orchestras, now it's significantly behind, for example, Los Angeles and San Francisco. A lot of those orchestras still have well-funded pensions.

I try to imagine being on that stage and going ‘Well, we played OK. Boston would have played a little better. San Francisco would have played a little better.’ It’s inconceivable! But that’s our management’s attitude. No, we can’t provide them with what our counterparts do, but that’s ok, we’re fine with being second rate.

JL: Why is the attack on pensions and salaries important to fight?

EG: There are a few other orchestras with higher wages than us and a defined-benefit pension plan. To remain competitive with those orchestras we have to keep that. Otherwise, the CSO, which used to be a destination orchestra, will become a stepping stone to a better job.

Max Raimi: Their side is a black box. They seem monolithic. It’s possible they are not. I imagine there are people on their side that see what is going on and are not real happy about it. If not, then we’re screwed. If they are really that nihilistic that they don’t care if they destroy the orchestra or not, then we have no leverage.

JL: How did you react to the “last, best and final” offer by management?

EG: I trust our negotiating committee. They are doing an amazing job. They all recommended against voting on it. They find it insulting. I have to put my faith in them and they are looking out for all of us and our best interests.

MR: We do know it’s not acceptable. It’s interesting because I’m fully vested. They can’t take my pension away. Looking at it from a totally self-interested point, I’m nuts! I should just take their offer because there’s no way I’m going to make this money I’ve lost.

I think for a lot of the trustees, money is their lodestar. You see how they conduct business. They are willing to hurt people and destroy families, so they can have $3 billion instead of $2 billion. I mean, I don’t understand it. It’s like reading about some Aztec human sacrifice thing. How can people do that?

But there’s people on their side that are that way. It’s incomprehensible to them that (veterans) say, ‘Yes, it’s good for us but it’s not good for our colleagues and people who aren’t in the orchestra yet and it’s not what we envision the CSO to be.’ Even though it’s not in our best financial interest [to be on strike], you’ve got to have something in your life more important than your net worth.

JL: What did you think about the piece by Lawrence Johnson in the Chicago Classical Review attacking the CSO musicians?

EG: It made me really upset that someone I considered a lover of music really doesn’t seem to love the musicians. I found that upsetting. The fact that he kept comparing what we do to the business world ... Well, we are not in the business world. We are a not-for-profit. I don’t really feel like you can compare our retirement benefits to someone who works at a bank. It’s just a very different job. The interview process is very different.

For us, we are spending thousands of dollars every time we take an audition. I for one took close to thirty auditions before I won my CSO job. I don’t want to think about how much money I spent just to win my job. This is supposed to be the end-all-be-all of jobs for me. I intend to be here for 35 years and I would like to retire with dignity.

JL: When did you join the CSO and what made you want to join?

EG: I joined more than two years ago in 2017. I grew up in Chicago in Hyde Park. I moved all around. The orchestra job I had prior to this was in Auckland, New Zealand. It was really great, but there was an opening in the CSO. My predecessor had been in the orchestra for, I think, 40 years. These openings don’t happen very often. You have to wait for someone to retire, maybe change careers or, in the worst-case scenario, maybe even die for the job to open up. There was an opening and I went for it. And it was one the best days of my life when I won that job.

MR: I was a freelancer in New York and I realized guys 10-15 years older than me weren’t doing any better than I was and a secure life was impossible. I realized that if I wanted to have a secure dignified middle-class life, the institutions that were providing that were the major orchestras.

So, I looked around and Chicago sounded great. I took a shot in the dark. I won the audition and Georg Solti [director of the CSO from 1969 – 1991] hired me and until recently I thought I had it made.

JL: What was it like playing under Solti?

He was a force of nature. He was this kinetic force. It was kind of rock ‘n’ roll. The rhythm was driving and relentless. In a way it was easy because you just went. With Daniel Barenboim [CSO music director from 1991 – 2004], it was more the rhythms of speech and more flexible … It was a lot of adrenalin.

JL: How long have you been playing?

EG: Since I was 8. I’m 32 now. It’s like another limb for me at this point.

JL: What is some of your favorite music that you have played?

EG: One of my favorite composers would have to be Mahler. I love the lushness and the big sound he gets from the whole orchestra. I love being surrounded by the big sound of the orchestra. I have always liked being immersed in that sound rather than playing a solo. Playing in this section—I’m second flute—it really suits me. Any of the Mahler symphonies are my favorites. Also Debussy and Ravel—the French impressionists—are really fun to play as well.

MR: I love Sibelius, Mahler. It depends who’s conducting. If you have a Nordic guy who understands Sibelius, that’s really cool. Or an old Viennese guy who has this pipeline into Schubert and Mahler. I guess, I have no favorites. There are a few composers I don’t particularly like, but a whole lot I love.

JL: Why is such music important to you?

EG: It’s a connection with history and the past. It’s great art that we get to experience now. It’s like going to see a Shakespeare play or going to see a really beautiful painting at a museum. There’s something about it we really connect with, which is why it has stood the test of all these hundreds of years. It’s something people can connect with even if they don’t have a musical education. They can feel something you can’t express in words.

JL: There’s a huge cultural value to music. Yet there’s the claim that there isn’t money for arts and culture. Do you have any thoughts on that?

EG: Yes, a great example is the fire at Notre Dame. People came to the aid of that situation with billions of dollars. I’m not saying the CSO is a more or less worthy cause. I do think the Notre Dame is an important cultural landmark. When people care about something, they will open up their checkbooks.

JL: I do think in general a large amount of the population cares a lot. But in the case of Notre Dame too, there was the sudden influx of hundreds of millions of dollars. There’s the role of the aristocratic principle more and more in funding culture. What do you think?

EG: I had a job in New Zealand where most of the funding came from the government. The job wasn’t as prestigious as the CSO. We didn’t really record or tour. But there was still this feeling that the government has got us, there’s always going to be funding. Obviously in America, there’s a different set-up. We rely heavily on philanthropy, and we’re extremely grateful to the people who give. Historically, the board was made up of people who really love music and that’s why they give money. I’ve heard in recent years it’s turned more corporate and there’s less of a connection with the individuals on the board and the music. Now they do it because it looks good among their friends.

JL: That’s an interesting point. Obviously, there’s always the risk of censorship or the feelings of the donors involved in terms of what they will fund. Knowing that culture relies on education and youth being exposed to it, did you follow the teachers’ strikes in the last year?

EG: A little bit. Definitely, the one in Los Angeles. Both of my parents worked for Chicago Public Schools. They were teachers and administrators both. They’re both retired now and they have pensions—which they’re extremely grateful for. I’ve seen how these labor disputes have affected my parents directly and also how coming out of better contracts made their lives better. I have a personal connection with teachers.

JL: Los Angeles is certainly one of those places. Denver, Chicago, previously, West Virginia. There’s a real fight against the cutbacks against education and arts education. I recently discovered that CPS outsourced arts education to Ingenuity, a third-party source, who find random groups to teach a program for a session, and that’s it.

EG: That’s not enough. It’s a real shame. Part of the problem is all of these charter schools too. A lot of super-rich people will give money to charter schools, but not to the public schools. Poorer neighborhoods don’t get their funding. It’s not fair. Everyone should have access to education and great arts education.

JL: In terms of these more frequent fights by teachers and workers to fight back, do you see any connection between these struggles and yours?

EG: If there’s a teachers’ strike, I plan to be on their picket lines to show my support. We’re fighting for similar things. Pushing back against the super-wealthy and we’ve had enough.

JL: Do you see—this is a little bit of a more complicated question—but we have also the rise of far-right-wing and nationalist movements. Do you see any role in music in combating nationalism, inequality and oppression?

EG: Certain composers who are long dead wrote about these things, Mahler being one of them. Beethoven definitely—kind of just sticking it to the man. The music still resonates today because it speaks to those issues. I don’t think we’re directly necessarily doing anything, but still continuing to play music is putting good energy out in the world. We have people in the orchestra from lots of different countries and lots of different backgrounds. It’s also been neat to meet people on the picket lines from Japan, Mexico and across the world to come to Chicago for one reason, you know?

JL: Does the cultural work of the orchestra resonate in the context of the growth of right-wing movements?

MR: We were naive as artists. We’re in this bubble. Surely, we thought, they won’t hurt us. But, yes, there’s evil in the land. I don’t know how else to put it. And it was naïve to think that it wasn’t going to hit us. The other thing I’ll say is, people know they are getting screwed and the politicians incite rage. Trump didn’t come out of nowhere. It didn’t turn out to be a great solution, but it was people saying screw you.

There is this feeling [among a social layer] that wealth is its own justification. I don’t know many of the trustees. I met Helen Zell and, well, enough said. I do think there is a feeling that ‘I have wealth and power and I can bend the world to my will.’ It really started with Reagan, this idea that paying taxes is punishment. ‘We don’t want to pay you any more than I have to and I can have a perfectly good orchestra for less money. And I’ve got better things to do with my money than spend it on my community.’"our reporters"World Socialist Website
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Past Performances

Friday, May 15, 2020CYSO Masterclass on Facebook LiveFacebook LiveChicago, ILmore info...
September 18, 2017Performances with the Chicago Symphony OrchestraSymphony CenterChicago, ILFor more information about upcoming CSO performances please visit cso.orgmore info...
July 21, 2017Performances with Auckland PhilharmoniaAuckland Town HallAuckland, NZfor more information about Emma's performances with the APO, please visit https://www.apo.co.nz/whats-on/more info...
Friday, June 30, 2017Beneath the Midnight SunSt Luke's RemueraAucklandEmily Granger, harpWorks for flute and harp by Australian, New Zealand, and American composers, as well as beloved classics.more info...
Thursday, June 29, 2017Beneath the Midnight SunCreative Space 99SydneyEmily Granger, harpWorks for flute and harp by Australian, New Zealand, and American composers, as well as beloved classics.more info...
Sunday, June 25, 2017Beneath the Midnight SunSt Johns SouthgateMelbourneEmily Granger, harpWorks for flute and harp by Australian, New Zealand, and American composers, as well as beloved classics.more info...
Tuesday, June 20, 2017MasterclassAustralian National Academy of MusicMelbourne, VICmore info...
Monday, May 29, 2017MasterclassUniversity of Auckland School of Musicorchestral excerptsmore info...
Sunday, September 20, 2015Pre-Season Woodwind Ensemble: Sweet SerenadesNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLBird: Suite for Double Wind Quintet
Riegger: Concerto for Piano and Woodwind Quintet
Mozart: Serenade No. 12
more info...
Sunday, August 23, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, CORobert Spano, conductor
Susanna Phillips, soprano
Mozart: Bella mia flamma...Restra, o cara, K. 528
Ravel: Sheherazade
Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A minor, "Tragic"
more info...
Saturday, August 22, 2015Chamber Music MarathonAspen, COAva Nazar, pianoSchubert: Introduction and Variations on "Trockne Blumen", D. 802more info...
Thursday, August 20, 2015Chamber music with Conrad Tao, piano and Stefan Jackiw, violinHarris HallAspen, COConrad Tao, piano
Harrison Linsey, oboe
Taylor Marino, clarinet
Christina Bonatakis, bassoon
Rachelle Jenkins, horn
Poulenc: Sextet
Brahms: String Sextet No. 1 in B-flat major, op. 18
more info...
Sunday, August 16, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, CODavid Robertson, conductor
Simone Porter, violin
Christopher Rouse: Symphony No. 3
Barber: Violin Concerto, op. 14
Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123
more info...
Tuesday, August 11, 2015Piazzolla's Maria de Buenos AiresHarris HallAspen, COScott Terrell, conductor
Cecelia Hall, mezzo-soprano
Luis Alejandro Orozco, baritone
Piazzolla: Maria de Buenos Airesmore info...
Thursday, August 6, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraRaviniaHighland Park, ILRafael Payare, conductor
Pinchas Zukerman, piano
Berlioz: Roman Carnival Overture
Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1
Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade
more info...
Wednesday, August 5, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraRaviniaHighland Park, ILPablo Heras-Casado, conductor
Peter Serkin, piano
Beethoven: Overture to Egmont
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 19
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3
more info...
Sunday, August 2, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, COMichael Stern, conductor
Robert McDuffie, violin
Ravel: Alborada del gracioso
Bernstein: Serenade
Debussy: Iberia from Images
Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis after Themes by Carl Mariav on Weber
more info...
Sunday, July 26, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, COLudovic Morlot, conductor
Alisa Weilerstein, cello
Stravinsky: Petrushka (1911)
Debussy: Prelude to the Aternoon of a Faun
Prokofiev: Symphony-Concerto for Cello and Orchestra in E minor, op. 125
more info...
Sunday, July 26, 2015Performance Today with Fred ChildHarris HallAspen, COhttp://www.yourclassical.org/story/2015/07/30/on-stage-at-aspen-joyce-yang-and-a-standout-student-trioDebussy: Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp

Katherine Siochi, harp
Sofia Nikas, viola
more info...
Tuesday, July 21, 2015Music with a ViewAspen Art MuseumAspen, COKatherine Siochi, harp
Sofia Nikas, viola
Debussy: Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harpmore info...
Sunday, July 19, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, COHannu Lintu, conductor
Orli Shaham, piano
R. Strauss: Don Juan, op. 20
Steven Mackey: Stumble to Grace
Sibelius: Symphony No. 5 in E-flat major, op. 82
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Friday, July 17, 2015Aspen Chamber SymphonyBenedict Music TentAspen, COLarry Rachleff, conductor
Daniel Hope, violin
Tengku Irfan, piano
Messaien: Oiseaux exotiques
Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in D minor
Stravinsky: Suite from Pulcinella
more info...
Sunday, July 12, 2015Aspen Festival OrchestraBenedict Music TentAspen, COChristian Armig, conductor
Augustin Hadelich, violin
Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D major, op. 61
R Strauss: Also sprach Zarathustra, op. 30
more info...
Sunday, June 7, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILLudovic Morlot, conductor
Denis Kozhukhin, piano
Ravel: Beyond the Score
Ravel: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
Ravel: La Valse
more info...
Saturday, June 6, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILLudovic Morlot, conductor
Denis Kozhukhin, piano
Gershwin: An American in Paris
Ravel: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
Stravinsky: Jeu de cartes
Ravel: La Valse
more info...
Friday, June 5, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILLudovic Morlot, conductor
Denis Kozhukhin, piano
Ravel: Beyond the Score
Ravel: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
Ravel: La Valse
more info...
Thursday, June 4, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILLudovic Morlot, conductor
Denis Kozhukhin, piano
Gershwin: An American in Paris
Ravel: Piano Concerto for the Left Hand
Stravinsky: Jeu de cartes
Ravel: La Valse
more info...
Tuesday, April 14, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILBernard HaitinkMahler 7more info...
Sunday, April 12, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILBernard HaitinkMahler 7more info...
Saturday, April 11, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILBernard HaitinkMahler 7more info...
Friday, April 10, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILBernard HaitinkMahler 7more info...
Thursday, April 9, 2015Chicago Symphony OrchestraOrchestra HallChicago, ILBernard HaitinkMahler 7more info...
Saturday, August 3, 2013Cabrillo Festival OrchestraCivic CenterSanta Cruz, CASean Friar Noise Gate
Thomas Newman It Got Dark (with Kronos Quartet)
Mason Bates Alternative Energy
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Friday, August 2, 2013Cabrillo Festival OrchestraCivic CenterSanta Cruz, CADerek Bermel Dust Dances
Kevin Puts Flute Concerto (Adam Walker, flute)
Christopher Rouse Symphony No. 3
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May 10, 2013Lexington PhilharmonicSingletary Center for the ArtsLexington, KYScott Terrell, conductor; Chu Fang Huang, piano; Project SEE TheatreRachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3, Peter Boyer: Ellis Island: The Dream of Americamore info...
May 4, 2013Milwaukee Symphony OrchestraUihlein HallMilwaukee, WIFrancesco Lecce-Chong, conductor; Augustin Hadelich, violinStrauss and Mozartmore info...
May 3, 2013Milwaukee Sympony OrchestraUihlein HallMilwaukee, WIFrancesco Lecce-Chong, conductor; Augustin Hadelich, violinStrauss and Mozartmore info...
April 28, 2013New World SymphonyNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLMichael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Kiera Duffy, sopranoMahler 4more info...
April 27, 2013New World SymphonyNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLMichael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Kiera Duffy, sopranoMahler 4more info...
April 20, 2013Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra GalaPotawatomi CasinoMilwaukee, WIFrancesco Lecce-Chong, conductor; Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, guest artistsCopland, Adams, Gershwin, and Wagnermore info...
April 12, 2013Lexington PhilharmonicSingletary Center for the ArtsLexington, KYJohannes Moser, cello; Scott Terrell, conductorMason Bates: Rusty Air in Carolina, Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1, Dvorak: Symphony No. 8more info...
April 5, 2013Musicians Club of Women Artists in RecitalFourth Presbyterian ChurchChicago, ILmore info...
March 10, 2013Quad Cities SymphonyCentennial HallRock Island, ILStravinsky Rite of Springmore info...
March 9, 2013Quad Cities SymphonyAdler TheatreDavenport, IAStravinsky Rite of Springmore info...
March 1, 2013Lexington Philharmonic + eighth blackbirdSingletary Center for the ArtsLexington, KYScott Terrell, conductor; eighth blackbirdMozart: Divertimento K. 136, Jenner Higdon: On a Wire, Beethoven: Symphony No. 7more info...
February 16, 2013University of Chicago New Music EnsembleFulton Recital Hall
February 8, 2013Fullscore Chamber OrchestraSt. Paul's ChurchGurnee, ILWorks by Brahms, Britten, and Walker
February 3, 2013Lexington Philharmonic: Piazzolla's Tango OperaDowntown Arts CenterLexington, KYPiazzolla: Maria de Buenos Airesmore info...
February 2, 2013Lexington Philharmonic: Piazzolla's Tango OperaDowntown Arts CenterLexington, KYPiazzolla: Maria de Buenos Airesmore info...
February 2, 2013Lexington Philharmonic: Piazzolla's Tango OperaDowntown Arts CenterLexington, KYPiazzolla: Maria de Buenos Airesmore info...
February 1, 2013Lexington Philharmonic: Piazzolla's Tango OperaDowntown Arts CenterLexington, KYPiazzolla: Maria de Buenos Airesmore info...
January 13, 2013Lexington Philharmonic - Two by SeussLexington Opera HouseLexington, KYA family concert featuring music from Dr. Seuss' beloved Green Eggs and Ham and Gerald McBoing Boing.
December 30, 2012BENEFIT CONCERT in the Memory of the Victims of the Sandy Hook TPleasant HomeOak Park, ILRecent graduates from Juilliard, Curtis, and Manhattan School of Music host a musical meditation for the Chicago community.
December 17, 2012Musicians Club of WomenUnion League ClubChicago, ILalso featuring Emily Granger, harp and Laura Miller, violinworks by Bach, Piazzolla, Paganini, Ibert, and more!
December 9, 2012Lexington Philharmonic: Candy Cane Takes a Global Sleigh RideSingletary Centery for the ArtsLexington, KY
AnaphoraGreen MillChicago, ILmore info...
November 16, 2012Lexington PhilharmonicSingletary Center for the ArtsLexington, KentuckyScott Terrell, Music DirectorSibelius 5, Copland Old American Songs No. 1, Copland Suite from the Tenderland, Vaughan Williams, Five Mystical Songsmore info...
November 10, 2012University of Chicago New Music EnsembleFulton HallChicago, IL
October 28, 2012Voices of AmericaLexington Opera HouseLexington, KYFeaturing music from American composers Aaron Copland, George Chadwick and Steve Heitzeg and exploring some of America's most influential story tellers like Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson and Martin Luther King, Jr.more info...
October 7, 201225th Season Opening Concert: The Russian Musical SoulNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLMichael Tilson Thomas, conductorStravinsky Petrushka, Tchaikovsky 4th Symphonymore info...
October 6, 201225th Season Opening Concert: The Russian Musical SoulNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLMichael Tilson Thomas, conductorStravinsky Petrushka, Tchaikovsky 4th Symphonymore info...
September 16, 2012Grand Finale Closing Academy ConcertGreat Hall - National Pastime TheaterChicago, ILMatthias Pintscher, conductor; Josephine Lee, conductor; George Lepauw, piano; Ted Seymour, choreographer; Joffrey Ballet’s Abigail Simon and Ogulcan Borova; Ballet Chicago; Chicago Children’s ChoirBeethoven "Creatures of Prometheus" Opus 43, Beethoven Symphony Nr. 3 in E Flat Major, Opus 55 "Eroica", Beethoven Fantasy in C Minor for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra Opus 80
September 13, 2012International Beethoven FestivalMason Hall - National Pastime TheaterChicago, ILJ.S. Bach - All Six Brandenburg Concerti
September 11, 2012International Beethoven FestivalMason Hall - National Pastime TheaterChicago, ILRachel Barton Pine, violin; Prometheus EnsembleMohammed Fairouz Violin Sonata (Chicago premiere), Mohammed Fairouz "Furia" (Chicago premiere)more info...
September 8, 2012Beethoven Festival Grand Opening ConcertGreat Hall - National Pastime TheaterChicago, ILJames Ehnes, violin; Daniel Boico, conductormore info...
May 5, 2012University of Chicago New Music EnsembleRockefeller ChapelChicago, ILwith The Spektral Quartetmulti-media performance of Andrea Clearfield's Lung-Tamore info...
April 15, 2012Skokie Valley Symphony OrchestraNorth Shore Performing Arts CenterSkokie, ILFrancesco Milioto, conductorMahler 4more info...
March 31, 2012The Three GracesThe Heartland CafeChicago, ILEmily Granger, harp; Rose Armbrust Griffin, violaWorks by Debussy, Jolivet, Pärt, Piazzolla, Radiohead, Anna Clyne, and more!more info...
March 25, 2012Dempster Street Pro Musica - ConcertofestSPACEEvanston, ILYuan Qing Yu, violin; Eugenia Moliner, flute; Stephen Alltop, harpsichord; Michael Henoch, oboeJ.S. Bach - Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, J.S. Bach - Concerto in C Minor for violin and oboe, Georg Philipp Telemann - Concerto in G for violin, flute, and oboe, C.P.E. Bach - Concerto for harpsichord, Tomaso Albinoni - Concerto for oboe in B flat Majormore info...
March 4, 2012RecitalMontgomery PlaceChicago, ILworks by Jolivet, Debussy, Ibert, Pärt
January 28, 2012New World Symphony - 'Dance of Devotion'New World CenterMiami Beach, FLMark Wigglesworth - conductor
October 27, 2011Noontime Concert SeriesFulton Recital Hall, University of ChicagoChicago, ILEmily Granger, harp; Alex Smith, viola
August 7, 2011Master's RecitalFord Hall, University of IndianaBloomington, IN
Indiana University Festival OrchestraIU AuditoriumBloomington, INGiancarlo Guerrero, conductor
July 21, 2011Indiana University Festival OrchestraIU AuditoriumBloomington, INBramwell Tovey, conductor
July 2, 2011Indiana University Festival OrchestraRavinia PavilionHighland Park, ILMichael Stern, conductor; Joshua Bell, violin
July 1, 2011Indiana University Festival OrchestraIU AuditoriumBloomington, INMichael Stern, conductor; Joshua Bell, violin
May 30-June 18, 2011Sarasota FestivalSarasota, FL
May 8, 2011New World SymphonyNew World CenterMiami Beach, FLPeter Oundjian - conductor

some friends!

Alexander Lovehttps://www.alexanderlovemusic.com/
Emily Grangerhttp://www.emilygranger.com

Teaching

Emma Gerstein Faculty Profile | Roosevelt Universityclick here for more info
Online lessonsBook lessons with Emma online!https://online.aeyons.com/emma_gerstein
Flute lessons with Emma Gerstein - Play with a Proclick here for more info

who made my website?

Aestheticize Mediaweb/graphic designhttp://www.aestheticize.com




Coming soon...

publicity photos


Interviews

Emma Gerstein on Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe - YouTube
Interview with Emma Gerstein, CSO flute. Ravel Daphnis and Chloe & Piano Concerto for the Left Hand April 5-10, 2018: Matthias Pintscher makes his CSO podium...
Fireside Chat with Emma Gerstein and David Cooper from May 1, 20
Emma Gerstein is the Second Flute of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and from Chicago originally! Emma talks about growing up in Chicago and then coming back ...
Classical Musicians' Roundtable: Mental Health and Musicians
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Performances

Giuseppe Verdi - Riccardo Muti - Chicago Symphony Orchestra - Ai
Riccardo Muti leads the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the Ballet from Act 2, Scene 2 of Verdi’s Aida. This program marked the finale of the 2018/19 CSO Main ...
Bach Flute Sonata in G minor BWV 1020 - Allegro - YouTube
Emma Gerstein, flute Emily Granger, harp Recorded live in Ganz Hall Chicago, IL June 2019 Video by Todd Rosenberg
Debussy Bilitis IV. Pour la danseuse aux crotales trans. Lambert
Emma Gerstein, flute Emily Granger, harp Recorded live in Ganz Hall Chicago, IL June 2019 Video by Todd Rosenberg